Technologies





Hard Chrome Plating

Hard Chrome plating (also known as "Industrial Chrome") is applied to ferrous and nonferrous materials to improve wear and abrasion resistance, reduce friction, prevent seizing and galling, and to restore the dimensions of undersized parts. Hard chrome plating is an electroplating process in which chromium is deposited from a chromic acid solution.

Hard Chrome can be applied to all types of stainless steel alloys, most ferrous metals, and some nonferrous metals including copper and brass. Please contact our application engineers to discuss the feasibility of applying Hard Chrome to other metals such as aluminum.

Hard Chrome is used in a variety of solutions including:

  • Piston rings & valves
  • Tools & dies
  • Auto engine, drive train and suspension parts
  • Motor shafts
  • Aircraft landing gears and components
  • Machinery parts
  • Gears
  • and more...


Grinding

Our grinding capabilities offers machine breakdown repairs to companies in the manufacturing industry with moving parts. Our extensive in-house grinding and metalizing capabilities enable us to repair worn machine parts such as gear shafts, drive spindles, as well as spindle housings.

Polishing

Technically polishing refers to processes that use an abrasive that is glued to the work wheel, while buffing uses a loose abrasive applied to the work wheel. Polishing is a more aggressive process while buffing is less harsh, which leads to a smoother, brighter finish.[1] A common misconception is that a polished surface has a mirror bright finish, however most mirror bright finishes are actually buffed. Polishing is often used to enhance the appearance of an item, prevent contamination of instruments, remove oxidation, create a reflective surface, or prevent corrosion in pipes. In metallography and metallurgy, polishing is used to create a flat, defect-free surface for examination of a metal's microstructure.

Straightening

In most cases, bent rods can be straightened in a press. It is sometimes possible to straighten hydraulic cylinder rods without damaging the hard-chrome plating, however if the chrome is damaged, the rod must be either re-chromed or replaced. If a rod is bent, then it is wise to check actual rod loading against permissible rod loading based on the cylinder's mounting arrangement and the tensile strength of the rod material.